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Photographer: Julia Comita
Makeup: Laura Stiassni
Hair: Ayae Yamamoto
Model: Tsheca @ Ford Models
Photo Assistant: Ian Jones II
Production: Numi Prasarn

Photographer: Julia Comita

Makeup: Laura Stiassni

Hair: Ayae Yamamoto

Model: Tsheca @ Ford Models

Photo Assistant: Ian Jones II

Production: Numi Prasarn

I do miss Tumblr. 
Came across this while looking for references for a shoot. Really hope this is an actual clip from a Serge Lutens shoot but I don’t recall him doing video…

I do miss Tumblr. 

Came across this while looking for references for a shoot. Really hope this is an actual clip from a Serge Lutens shoot but I don’t recall him doing video…

cutesign:

The Kokonatchi is a cute desktop robot that monitors your twitter feed and notifies you of new messages by changing colors in sync with the emotion of the tweet. Kokonatchi will vibrate if it thinks the tweeter is scared, and to reply directly to the incoming message, just massage it. You can also record up to 20 words (1000 with expandable microSD card) for the little fella to say to you.

cutesign

Oof. I would hate to see the colors/vibrations of my feed. It would need a lot of petting.

(Source: thecoolgadgets.com, via ninondominion)

theneonblack:

Hookah with friends! Very much loving Numi’s pastel color palette.

Hookah + Lina makes me happy

theneonblack:

Hookah with friends! Very much loving Numi’s pastel color palette.

Hookah + Lina makes me happy

(Source: theneonblack)

(Source: haikutes, via chisel)

thelove-letter:

For Numi.


I was actually in a pretty shitty mental space today so this is a special kind of magic to have plopped into my lap. So grateful for my friends.

thelove-letter:

For Numi.

I was actually in a pretty shitty mental space today so this is a special kind of magic to have plopped into my lap. So grateful for my friends.

My new reaction gif for when I throw all the fucks I give in the air.

My new reaction gif for when I throw all the fucks I give in the air.

(Source: fiftyshadesofshinee)

m1k3y:


In reality, once helmet, gloves and an oxygen-supplying backpack were added, it was a wearable spacecraft. Cocooned within 21 layers of synthetics, neoprene rubber and metalized polyester films, Armstrong was protected from the airless Moon’s extremes of heat and cold (plus 240 Fahrenheit degrees in sunlight to minus 280 in shadow), deadly solar ultraviolet radiation and even the potential hazard of micrometeorites hurtling through the void at 10 miles per second.
The Apollo suits were blends of cutting-edge technology and Old World craftsmanship. Each suit was hand-built by seamstresses who had to be extraordinarily precise; a stitching error as small as 1/32 inch could mean the difference between a space-worthy suit and a reject. While most of the suit’s materials existed long before the Moon program, one was invented specifically for the job. After a spacecraft fire killed three Apollo astronauts during a ground test in 1967, NASA dictated the suits had to withstand temperatures of over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The solution was a state-of-the-art fabric called Beta cloth, made of Teflon-coated glass microfibers, used for the suit’s outermost layer.

m1k3y:

In reality, once helmet, gloves and an oxygen-supplying backpack were added, it was a wearable spacecraft. Cocooned within 21 layers of synthetics, neoprene rubber and metalized polyester films, Armstrong was protected from the airless Moon’s extremes of heat and cold (plus 240 Fahrenheit degrees in sunlight to minus 280 in shadow), deadly solar ultraviolet radiation and even the potential hazard of micrometeorites hurtling through the void at 10 miles per second.

The Apollo suits were blends of cutting-edge technology and Old World craftsmanship. Each suit was hand-built by seamstresses who had to be extraordinarily precise; a stitching error as small as 1/32 inch could mean the difference between a space-worthy suit and a reject. While most of the suit’s materials existed long before the Moon program, one was invented specifically for the job. After a spacecraft fire killed three Apollo astronauts during a ground test in 1967, NASA dictated the suits had to withstand temperatures of over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The solution was a state-of-the-art fabric called Beta cloth, made of Teflon-coated glass microfibers, used for the suit’s outermost layer.

(Source: smithsonianmag.com)

(via aprilfoolromance-deactivated201)

      A page from Jake Wyatt’s upcoming webcomic Necropolis. I have been obsessing over this figure of death as an idea for another tattoo.

      To me, it is beautiful and delicate. The three figures in one speak to the feeling of multiplicity and in a strange way, wholeness of death and being mortal. We are created from a multitude of experiences looking in several directions but we ultimately have one endpoint, our inevitable story is death. It is all encompassing. And it is a sovereign. I suppose it might be cliché to get a tattoo of death as a reminder to live, but I think this particular design speaks to me because it is itself a reminder of life past, present, and future. It’s not just a battle cry or an alarm, it is a record. Things we’ll experience and things we have already experienced. Things we have lost and things we will lose. And there is a calm, regal beauty to that, a peace if you will.

      But anyway, aesthetically (and symbolically) I still need to find something else to balance it out before I commit to it. Because while death is a whole in and of itself it is not the whole of my story.

      A page from Jake Wyatt’s upcoming webcomic Necropolis. I have been obsessing over this figure of death as an idea for another tattoo.

      To me, it is beautiful and delicate. The three figures in one speak to the feeling of multiplicity and in a strange way, wholeness of death and being mortal. We are created from a multitude of experiences looking in several directions but we ultimately have one endpoint, our inevitable story is death. It is all encompassing. And it is a sovereign. I suppose it might be cliché to get a tattoo of death as a reminder to live, but I think this particular design speaks to me because it is itself a reminder of life past, present, and future. It’s not just a battle cry or an alarm, it is a record. Things we’ll experience and things we have already experienced. Things we have lost and things we will lose. And there is a calm, regal beauty to that, a peace if you will.

      But anyway, aesthetically (and symbolically) I still need to find something else to balance it out before I commit to it. Because while death is a whole in and of itself it is not the whole of my story.